Ready for your first appointment?

 What Can I Expect in a First Reflexology Visit?…The following section walks you through a typical appointment and answers some common concerns.

What happens in the intake?

reflexology session begins with the practitioner conducting a brief health history, checking in case reflexology might not be the best choice of therapy for you.

The practitioner explains how reflexology works and what happens during a session. The reflexologist also informs you that reflexology does not treat specific illness and is not a substitute for medical treatment. You may be asked to sign a consent form.

Remember that it is okay, and even expected, for you to ask questions. You should feel comfortable communicating with the reflexologist. If the practitioner is not forthcoming with information, or is dismissive of questions or concerns, this could be a “red flag,” and you have every right to terminate the appointment.

How does a typical session start?

The practitioner may choose to work only on the feet, depending on your specific health issues. Some problems respond better to work on the feet, others to work on the hands.

If the reflexologist chooses to work on your feet, you will lie or sit down, remaining fully clothed except for your shoes and socks. The practitioner may wash your feet and soak them in warm water, then position them at his or her chest level.

The practitioner will begin by assessing your feet for open wounds, rashes, sores, plantar warts or bunions and will ask you about any foot or leg pain that could hinder treatment.

Generally a session lasts between 30-60 minutes. You can rest or talk during the session at your discretion, also you add more time. If you fall asleep during the session, you will still receive the benefits of the treatment. Feedback during the session is encouraged, and of course, you can request that the session stop at any time.

What is a reflexology treatment?

A complete reflexology therapy session uses many different techniques and includes all of the points on both feet (and perhaps the hands and ears). The session generally starts at the fingers or toes, and works down to the heel of the hand or foot, then works the areas on the sides and top. It is a massage for your foot.

By working all of the points, the reflexologist addresses internal organs and glands as well as muscle groups, bones, nerve ganglions (solar plexus, brachial plexus) and nerves (sciatic) during a session.

If reflexologists find congestion or tightness during the session, they will apply pressure to work on bringing the body back into balance. If the practitioner finds an area of pain, the area is worked until harmony is brought to the area or point. To “release pain” is not the model: the goal is rather to bring the whole body into balance, and then the pain will subside. The reflexologist stimulates the nervous system to do the work, it is not the therapist who “fixes” it.

The reflexologist can return to that area or spot at the end of the session, confirming the pain has released.

What will I experience during the session?

Experiences with reflexology sessions vary from a general sense of relaxation and rest to a conscious awareness internally of the area of the body where the practitioner is working through the foot.

 

What happens at the end of the session?

Most reflexologists have some type of calm, peaceful way of closing the session that involves stroking the hand or foot and holding the limb in some manner. The important aspect is for you to feel comforted and nurtured, and to feel that you have had time for yourself during the session.

Now that the session is complete, you should not feel rushed. Gently bring yourself back into the present moment, and orient yourself. As you feel comfortable, gather yourself and your belongings to leave.

The practitioner may recommend that you drink water, rest if necessary, and pay attention to your body in the next few hours. If any questions or concerns arise, you should be able to call the practitioner.

 

How many sessions are needed?

The number of sessions varies and is determined by the client’s health and reasons for seeking reflexology. But in general, results from reflexology are often subtle and are cumulative.

If you are dealing with a specific illness or condition, you may need to have more frequent sessions. You can talk to the therapist about it.

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